Saturday, April 19, 2014

Josephine Miles scored by Joe Thebeau and Carrie M. Becker

 
"Stanza 8 in Miniature" by Carrie M. Becker (after Josephine Miles),
1/6th scale diorama / miniature shadow box

Poetry Scores' Spring 2014 project in our home city of St. Louis is devoted to "Ten Dreamers in a Motel."

This poem by Josephine Miles (1911-1985) was published in her 1955 book Prefabrications, a prescient - perhaps prophetic - registry of changes in the American built landscape and how that changed the way people construct their own reality (and dream worlds).

SOHA Studio + Gallery will host a one-night-only Poetry Scores art invitational based on "Ten Dreamers in a Motel" 6-10 p.m. Friday, April 25 at the gallery, 4915 Macklind Ave. Julie Malone and Kat Dunne of SOHA commissioned ten women artists to each make visual art to one of the poem's ten numbered sections.

Poetry Scores also has commissioned ten musical scores to the ten numbered parts of "Ten Dreamers in a Motel." That live score will be presented 9 p.m. Friday May, 23 at The Tap Room, 2121 Locust, followed by Ann Hirschfeld and Mark Buckheit (10 p.m.) and Dugout Canoe (11 p.m.). Ten women will read the ten numbered parts of the poem in between the songs. It's a free show.

Here is Joe Thebeau's score of the 8th numbered section of "Ten Dreamers in a Motel," paired with Carrie M. Becker's visual adaptation of the same passage of poetry.


"Stanza 8 in Miniature" by Carrie M. Becker (after Josephine Miles),
1/6th scale diorama / miniature shadow box

 Free mp3

"This weariness"
(Josephine Miles, Joe Thebeau)
(4:05)

Performed and recorded by Joe Thebeau

Poetry (c) 1955 Josephine Miles
Music (c) 2013 Joe Thebeau


Joe Thebeau
from a Finn's Motel video shoot
 

This recording may be freely shared for non-commercial uses. For any other usage, contact Poetry Scores at brodog@hotmail.com and we will connect you with the composer and the poet's estate.

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Here is the part of the poem Joe and Carrie translated into their respective medium:


from "Ten Dreamers in a Motel" by Josephine Miles


8.

I went to consult a psychiatrist on this morning,
A nervous woman, whose curly-headed four-year-old child
Played in the room, sitting staunchly
On a great medical scales.

I defended myself thus. It looks as if
All this weariness came from too much work,
But rather I think it a problem of person,
Friend or foe, fortune of parent or pardon.

The nervous psychiatrist ran her hand through her hair
And glanced at her watch. Have you taken a trip lately,
It would do you good, and take your mother with you,
She needs it more than you do.

Then I laughed to hear my own prescription
Given to myself with such good humor
In the gray weariness. But then she said also,
Take with you also my curly-headed four-year-old child.

 *

"Ten Dreamers in a Motel" was published in Josephine Miles' 1955 book Prefabrications, which is included in her Collected Poems (University of Illinois Press, 1983).

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Joe Thebeau of Finn's Motel live on KDHX (four songs)

Finn's Motel on MySpace

The Finn's Motel record Escape Velocity is available at many online music portals.


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Read @PoetryScores on Twitter.

Monday, April 14, 2014

SOHA hosts Poetry Scores art invitational Friday, April 25


Robin Street-Morris, "Lampless Bastions"
(after Josephine Miles)

SOHA Studio + Gallery will host a one-night-only Poetry Scores art invitational 6-10 p.m. Friday, April 25 at the gallery, 4915 Macklind Ave.
SOHA asked ten women artists to respond to the poem “Ten Dreamers in a Motel” by Josephine Miles. The participating artists are:

In a classic Poetry Scores art invitational, visual artists are asked to respond to the same poem and title the work after a quote from the poem, then arrange the works according to where in the flow of the poem the language used for the title appears. For this invitational, each of the ten artists was assigned one of the poem's ten numbered parts.

Professionally mounted, original works of art will be exhibited and for sale in a variety of sizes and formats. Proceeds from sales will be split evenly between the artist, SOHA, and Poetry Scores, a St. Louis-based international arts organization that translates poetry into other media.

For more information on the art invitational, visit www.sohastudioandgallery.com or call Julie Malone (314-497-5202) or Kat Dunne (314-780-5151). Look around here at www.Poetryscores.blogspot.com for more information on Poetry Scores.

Image: Robin Street-Morris' contribution to the show "Lampless Bastions," after Josephine Miles,
2014. Watercolor and pastel on 300lb incised hot press paper. 12" x 20" (30 x 51cm).


NOTES
“Ten Dreamers in a Motel" is from Josephine Miles' 1955 collection Prefabrications. As its title brilliantly suggests, Prefabrications is about changes in the built environment of America, circa mid-20th century, and how that affected the mental and emotional constructions people place upon the world and the people in it.

"Ten Dreamers" may be the first poem ever where the motor hotel -- the motel -- is the defining organizing principle. The poem peeks briefly into ten separate sets of lives, brought together momentarily by nothing more than the accident of a shared stopping space along the road. We're introduced to these ten sets of lives through brilliant flashes of poetic language, like headlights through motel curtains, with the abrupt symbolism and concentrated emotional power of dreams. Download the poem.

Josephine Miles (1911-1985) was a major American poet from California who has never quite been recognized as such. She was the first tenured woman professor in the English department at the University of California - Berkeley, but her poetry suffered in the male-dominated literary establishment of her time. Her work, best represented in Collected Poems (University of Illinois Press), is ripe for rediscovery.

Poetry Scores also has commissioned ten musical scores to the ten numbered parts of "Ten Dreamers in a Motel." That live score will be presented 9 p.m. Friday May, 23 at The Tap Room, 2121 Locust, followed by Ann Hirschfeld and Mark Buckheit (10 p.m.) and Dugout Canoe (11 p.m.). It's a free show.

The ten composers are Nick Barbieri, Mark Buckheit, Mike Burgett, Heidi Dean, Robert Goetz, Ann Hirschfeld, Chris King & David Melson, Michael Martin, Tracy Swigert, Joe Thebeau. These songs will be performed Nick Barbieri, Mark Buckheit, Heidi Dean, Adam Long and Tracy Swigert, with ten women reading the ten parts of the poem before each of the ten songs.

Josephine Miles
 
 

Sunday, April 6, 2014

Uranium Film Festival in Rio de Janeiro to screen "Go South for Animal Index"

 


Poetry Scores was excited to learn that our movie "Go South for Animal Index" has been accepted to screen at the 2014 Uranium Film Festival in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

It is one of 53 movies involving uranium that will screen May 14 to May 24 in the Cinemateque of Rio de Janeiro´s Modern Art Museum. It will be considered for a 2014 "Yellow Oscar" Award; winners will be announced at the awards ceremony May 24.

We owe this honor to Dan Cross, who edited our movie and is one of its directors of photography and cinematographers. Dan spotted the festival, went through the trouble of subtitling our movie so it would be eligible, submitted it, and managed the submissions process. A big thanks to Dan, who is a volunteer on our projects, like everyone else in Poetry Scores.

We hope to raise funds to send Stefene Russell to Rio for the screening. Stefene wrote the poem "Go South for Animal Index," which was set to post-punk rock music by Matt Fuller and Chris King. Chris then imagined and directed a silent zombie movie to that post-punk rock score, and our movie is the result. Stefene also provides voice on the score and plays a major part in the movie.

This will be "Go South for Animal Index"'s second appearance at an international film festival - it played November 2013 at the St. Louis International Film Festival - but its first screening overseas and Poetry Scores' first screening at an international film festival outside of the U.S.

Our first movie, "Blind Cat Black," has screened at independent public screenings in Istanbul and Cannakale, Turkey.

The Uranium Film Festival organizers asked for a director's statement, so we provided one, even though Poetry Scores' collective way of making movies doesn't square very well with the auteur notion of filmmaking by a director who gets sole credit for a film.

*

"Go South for Animal Index"
Director's Statement

I directed "Go South for Animal Index," a cinematic fable of Los Alamos, with the St. Louis (Missouri, U.S.)-based arts collective Poetry Scores, which translates poetry into other media. Our movie started as a poem about the Bomb by Stefene Russell, who grew up downwind of the Nevada Test Site. We scored Stefene's poem for post-punk rock music, and then shot and edited a feature-length silent zombie movie to that post-punk rock score. Stefene's poem is really about the psychic burden of the Bomb's existence and encodes the Bomb's history from the infancy of nuclear physics to the present day. Our movie uses many of her poem's ideas, especially its Navajo cosmogony, but narrows the narrative to Los Alamos and adopts the primitive storytelling style of the fable. Our movie was shot on no budget and directed by an amateur. The editor, Dan Cross, assembled the 90-minute movie from director's notes that have the brevity of a folk tale, so the end visual result was a surprise to all of us. It reminds me somewhat of Michael Jackson's narrative videos, the American television classic "Gilligan's Island" (Gilligan's Alamos) and low-budget Turkish adaptations of "Star Wars."   -- Chris King

*

Here are all the films selected for the 4th International Film Festival Rio de Janeiro.

11:02 DE 1945. Brasil/Argentina, 2014, 31 min, Director Roberto Fernández
25 JAHRE TSCHERNOBYL, Germany/Ukraina, 27 min, Director Rainer Ludwigs
A WOMAN FROM FUKUSHIMA. Japan, 2014, 56 min, Director Yumiko Hayakawa.
A2-B-C. Japan, 2013, 71 min, Director Ian Thomas Ash.
AFTER ALL. Poland, 2013, 5 min, Director Bogna Kowalczyk.
ANOTHER CHERNOBYL. Ukraine, 2011, 56 min, Director Andrii Mykhailyk.
ATOMIC AFRICA. Germany, 80 min, Director Marcel Kolvenbach.
ATOMIC AUSTRALIA. Italy, 2006, 6 min, Director and Producer Ricardo Russo.
BEYOND THE CLOUD.France/Japan, 2013, 94 min, Director Keiko Courdy.
BEYOND THE WAVE. Germany/Japan, 2013, 83 min, Director Kyoko Miyake.
ETERNAL TEARS. Ukraine, 2011, 11 min, Director Kseniva Simonova.
EVOLUTION OF BEASTLINESS. Russia, 2014, 4 min, Director Collective Work Chidren’s “Detective”.
EXPLOSIONS BRING US CLOSER TOGETHER. USA, 2010, 2 min, Director Jonathan Johnson
FALLOUT . Australia, 2013, 86 min, Director Lawrence Johnston
FIGHT FOR THE ISLAND – PUNSU NO TAO. Taiwan/China, 2013, 65 min. Directors Kolas Yotaka, Chang, Jia-Wei
FINAL PICTURE. Germany, 2013, 92 min, Director Michael von Hohenberg
FLASHES OF HOPE: Hibakusha Traveling the World. Japan/Costa Rica, 2009, 61 min, Director Erika Bagnarello
FOUR STORIES ABOUT WATER. USA, 2012, 37 min, Directors Deborah Begel and David Lindblom.
FUKUSHAME. THE LOST JAPAN. Italy, 2013, 64 min, Director Alessandro Tesei
GO SOUTH FOR ANIMAL INDEX. USA, 2013, 90 min, Director Chris King
HIBAKUSHA. AT THE END OF THE WORLD.Japan, 2003, 116 min, Director Hitomi Kamanaka.
HOGAR, HOGAR. Spain, 2013, 17 min, Director Carlos Alonso Ojea
IN MY LIFETIME: The Nuclear World Project. USA, 2011, 109 min, Director Robert E. Frye
INHERITANCE. UK, 2013, 10 min, Director Margaret Cox
JOURNEY TO THE SAFEST PLACEE ON EARTH. Switzerland, 2013, 100 min, Director Edgar Hagen
KERN. Germany, 2013, 9 min, Director s Szu Ni Wen and Yichen Huang
LA FUGA B. Mexico, 2012, 2 min, Director Adrian Regnier Chavez
LA FUGA H. Mexico, 8 min, Director Adrian Regnier Chavez
MINING ON THE SWELL . USA, 2012, 18 min, Director and Producer Michael T. Searcy
NUCLEAR WASTE IN MY BACKYARD.Germany, 2012, 29 min, Director Irja Martens
NUCLEAR WINTER . Ireland, 2012, 5 min, Director Eimhin McNamara
POISON DUST. Armas DU radioativo em Irak. USA, 2005, 56 min, Director Sue Harris
RADIATION STORIES. India, 2010, 54 min, Director Amudhan R.P.
RARE EARTH. USA, 2014, 54 min, Director Elizabeth Knafo
REMOTE VIEWING. France, 2012, 5 min, Director and producer Cris Uberman
ROCK FLATS: LEGACY. USA, 2011, 23 min, Director Producer Scott Bison
SARDINIA’S DEADLY SECRET. Italy/Germany, 2012, 30 min, Director Birgit Hermes
SONG N°14. France, 2011, 5 min, Director Céline TROUILLET.
THE CLOUD HAS PASSED OVER US. Turkey, 2012, 15 min, Director Arif Karagulle.
THE HORSES OF FUKUSHIMA. Japan, 2013, 64 min, Director Yojyu Matsubayashi
THE NUCLEAR BOY SCOUT. UK, 2003, 24 min, Director Bindu Mathur.
THE RACE FOR URANIUM. France, 2009, 52 min, Director Patrick Forestier
THE UNIVERSITY OF NUCLEAR BOMBS. USA,2010, 55 min, Directors Mohamed Elsawi and Joshua King Ortis.
THE MYTH OF NUCLEAR DETERRENCE – IMAGE FILM by Nuclear Age Peace Foundation
TO DIG OR NOT TO DIG/THE BATTLE FOR GREENLAND. Norway, 2013, 8 min, Director Espen Rasmussen.
U - A STORY ABOUT URANIUM AND US. Canada, 2008, 9 min, Directors Shawn Arscott and Darlene Buckingham.
URANIUM: THE NAVAJO NUCLEAR LEGACY. USA,1997, 13 min, Directors and Producer Doug Brugge
WAKE UP. Australia, 12 min, Director Tony Barry
WARM – GLOW. Switzerland, 2013, 50 min, Director Marina Belobrovaja
WHEN THE DUST SETTLES ICBUW | ICBUW and IKV Pax Christi – Short Animation
WYHL? NAI HAEMMER GSAIT! - Der Widerstand gegen das Atomkraftwerk am Kaiserstuhl, Germany, 2013, 44 min, Director Goggo Gensch
YELLOW FEVER. The Uranium Legacy. USA, 56 min, Director Sophie Rousmaniere.
ZEITBOMBE. USA, 2010, 27 min, Director Edward Saint Pe’.



 

Friday, March 28, 2014

"Go South for Animal Index" to screen at SWIC in Belleville




Poetry Scores' movie Go South for Animal Index: a Fable of Los Alamos will screen 7 p.m. Friday, April 4 in the Liberal Arts Theater, Room LAC 1350, at Southwestern Illinois Community College (SWIC), 2500 Carlyle, Belleville, Illinois.

This SWIC faculty screening is free and open to the public.

Dan Cross, professor of film at SWIC, edited Go South for Animal Index and was one of its directors of photography and camera operators. He also directed many of the scenes he shot. He even makes an actor cameo as a uranium-mining Debased Cog, the movie's zombie-equivalents at the bottom of the atomic bomb effort.

"Dan joined our shoot as a zombie extra, but we soon realized we had the movie-making equivalent of atomic energy on our hands," says Chris King, director, a Granite City native. "He was shooting on every scene we could get him from that day on, and often left alone to direct the scenes he shot. Then, when we were done shooting, we just handed him all the footage, with some pretty spare editing instructions, and let him assemble the movie."

"The edit has taken nearly a year of work, but I was happy to do it because the of the quality of the material," Cross told the Belleville News-Democrat before the film's appearance in the 2013 St. Louis International Film Festival.

Read more here: http://www.bnd.com/2013/07/10/2689950/local-talent-shines-at-st-louis.html#storylink=cpy

Cross is sharing director credit with King on the next Poetry Scores movie, Jack Ruby's America, and will also direct photography on that movie and edit it.

Cross is an accomplished filmmaker in his own right, including the animated short Dive, which premiered at the St. Louis International Film Festival on the same bill as A: Anonymous by Daniel Bowers, widely recognized as the best independent feature film produced in St. Louis.

Go South for Animal Index, a 90-minute feature, will screen with a new short film by Stacy Singh, a SWIC colleague.

Following the screening, Cross and Singh will be joined by Chris King, director of Go South for Animal Index, to discuss their movies with the audience.

A Belleville people note: Chris King played in the band Enormous Richard, which was active in the early St. Louis alternative country scene with Belleville's own Uncle Tupelo. He also was close with Pops Farrar, father of the Farrar boys in Belleville, and produced a record for Pops, Memory Music: Songs and Stories from the Merchant Marine.

DIRECTIONS TO THE THEATER

Southwestern Illinois College is easily accessible by Metrolink. Just take the train east to the College Station stop. When you get off the train, walk straight across campus to the northwest corner, closest to Lowe's and you should see a sign for the film screening.  

If driving from the west, you can take 1-64 to the Greenmount Road exit (#16). Turn right on Greenmount and you'll come to Highway 161 in four miles. The college is at that intersection. The best place to park is the lot by the Liberal Arts Theater (the one closest to Lowe's, next to 161).  

If you go in the doors closest to that parking lot, the Liberal Arts Theater will be right inside those doors.  

The screening will start promptly at 7, so try to arrive early.  

For more information, email Dan Cross at dan.cross@swic.edu.

Dan Cross, directing and shooting a scene
from "Go South for Animal Index" in Cuba, Missouri.


MORE ON GO SOUTH

Go South for Animal Index was produced by Poetry Scores, an all-volunteer international arts organization dedicated to translating poetry into other media, based in St. Louis, but with outposts in Hilo (Hawaii), Los Angeles, Nashville and Istanbul.

The movie was directed by Chris King and edited by Dan Cross, based on a poem by Stefene Russell. Poetry Scores previously scored Stefene's poem to post-punk rock, and this movie was written, shot and edited to that score. So Go South can be considered a 90-minute silent movie with a rock & roll soundtrack.

Shot on location in St. Louis and Cuba, Missouri, Go South for Animal Index follows four related storylines: the development of the nuclear bomb on a secret military base; the nuclear-waste-related illness of a tribal girl living nearby; the travels of the widow and daughter of a nuclear scientist who dies on the base; and the drafting into military service of a vendor of stuffed animals. The quartet of stories intersects dramatically in the context of the first successful test of the atomic bomb.

Cinema St. Louis writes: "Setting Stefene Russell’s poem to an exceptional rock-music score and eschewing spoken dialogue, Go South for Animal Index freely mixes zombies, experimental elements, and silent-film tropes in a bold genre mash-up. The large ensemble cast includes many well-known St. Louisans: poet Russell; former fire chief Sherman George; international burlesque stars Lola van Ella and Kyla Webb; African-dance impresario Mama Lisa Gage; architectural historian and preservationist Michael R. Allen; and the late George Malich in his final big screen performance."

REACTIONS TO GO SOUTH

Go South premiered at the 2013 St. Louis Filmmakers Showcase. Here were some reactions:

"Go South for Animal Index is a beautiful visual poem." - Chris Clark, artistic director, Cinema St. Louis

"Heck of a good movie." - Joe Edwards, manager of Chuck Berry and owner of Blueberry Hill

"Go South for Animal Index reminds us of Nietzsche's admonition: ‘Whoever fights monsters should see to it that in the process he does not become a monster.’” – Michael A. Wolff, dean and professor of Law, Saint Louis University School of Law; former chief justice, Missouri Supreme Court

“This poedocudrama kept us all reaching back to refresh our memories of local, national and world histories.” – Mama Lisa Gage, arts organizer, choreographer, dancer

"Go South for Animal Index is an instrument of a higher power.” – Ellen Sheire, Jungian analyst

OTHER MEDIA ON GO SOUTH

A brief (6:33) documentary on the making of Go South for Animal Index, produced by Thomas Crone and directed by Andy Alton

A feature story on Go South for Animal Index from The Alton Telegraph

The original musical score to Go South for Animal Index, produced by Matt Fuller and Chris King (the soundtrack to the movie has additional music by Tory Z Starbuck and Middle Sleep)

Saturday, March 8, 2014

"The form of the object" : Carl Pandolfi scores Wittgenstein


A form of an object (in Carl Pandolfi's kitchen)
 

Poetry Scores is at the very beginning of a very long process of scoring Ludwig Wittgenstein's philosophical prose poem Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus (1921).

Soon enough we'll create an index page where the entire score can be followed in sequence, but for now we'll post finished mixes as they arrive, in or out of order.

Next up: "The form of the object" by Carl Pandolfi, which sets to music Proposition 2.013 through Proposition 2.0141 of the Tractatus.


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free mp3

"The form of the object"
(Wittgenstein, Ogden, Ramsey, Pandolfi)
Carl Pandolfi

Produced and recorded by Carl Pandolfi in St. Louis.

Carl Pandolfi plays piano, keyboards, electric guitar, electric bass, drums, harmonica and sings all vocals.
 
Executive producer: Chris King for Poetry Scores

Music (c) 2014 Carl Pandolfi

 *

We are scoring the first English translation of the Tractatus that C. K. Ogden commissioned and published and took credit for, but F. P. Ramsey actually performed, with benefit of Wittgenstein's corrections, delivered personally, mouth to ear, as Wittgenstein liked to do poetry (philosophy). Their translation is in the public domain and posted on Project Gutenberg, but here is the part Carl scored in "Form of the object."

*

 
from Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus
by Ludwig Wittgenstein
translated from German
by C. K. Ogden and F. P. Ramsey
 


2.013        Every thing is, as it were, in a space of possible atomic facts. I can think of this space as empty, but not of the thing without the space.

2.0131      A special object must lie in infinite space. (A point in space is an argument place.)

                 A speck in a visual field need not be red, but it must have a colour ; it has, so to speak, a colour space round it. A tone must have a pitch, the object of the sense of touch a hardness, etc.

2.014        Objects contain the possibility of all states of affairs.

2.0141      The possibility of its occurrence in atomic facts is the form of the object.

*

This has some amazing stuff in it. "I can think of this space as empty, but not of the thing without the space." -- that's one of those noggin knucklers that pretty cleanly divides people who take an interest in philosophical problems from those who do not.

I love the idea of a "colour space round" objects. And I love Ogden and Ramsey's British spelling of "color" and "around". I'm reminded of my first close British friend calling me when he lived in St. Louis. "Shall I come round?"

And what could be more fun than to sing, "(A point in space is an argument place.)"? That's how my print edition of the Ogden/Ramsey translation reads. The Project Gutenberg transcription of that translation that I gave to Carl reads, "(A point in space is a place for an argument.)" That's what Carl sings. That's some stunning language, either way you spot the rhyme.


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Carl Pandolfi
 
This is the third and final song in what I think of as Carl Pandolfi's "Atomic Facts Suite," though we'll hear more from him in songs he is writing with Mike Burgett, one of his bandmates in The Lettuce Heads, one of St. Louis' greatest-ever rock bands. He also played in another band that fits that description, The Painkillers. Carl has a terrific solo record, What Kind of Life, and is on SoundCloud. He also teaches music at The College School

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The Ogden/Ramsey translation of the Tractatus is in the public domain. The music is (c) 2014 by Carl Pandolfi. Free sharing of this mp3 is welcome and encouraged, but please consult Poetry Scores for production-quality audio and composer permission before making any commercial use. Thanks!

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Project announcement


 

Wednesday, March 5, 2014

"In the nature of the object" : Pandolfi scores Wittgenstein




Poetry Scores is at the very beginning of a very long process of scoring Ludwig Wittgenstein's philosophical prose poem Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus (1921).

Soon enough we'll create an index page where the entire score can be followed in sequence, but for now we'll post finished mixes as they arrive, in or out of order.

Next up: "In the nature of the object" by Carl Pandolfi, which sets to music Proposition 2.0122 through Proposition 2.0124 of the Tractatus.


*

free mp3

"In the nature of the object"
(Wittgenstein, Ogden, Ramsey, Pandolfi)
Carl Pandolfi

Produced and recorded by Carl Pandolfi in St. Louis.

Carl Pandolfi plays piano, electric bass and sings all vocals.
 
Executive producer: Chris King for Poetry Scores

Music (c) 2014 Carl Pandolfi

 *

We are scoring the first English translation of the Tractatus that C. K. Ogden commissioned and published and took credit for, but F. P. Ramsey actually performed, with benefit of Wittgenstein's corrections, delivered personally, mouth to ear, as Wittgenstein liked to do poetry (philosophy). Their translation is in the public domain and posted on Project Gutenberg, but here is the part Carl scored in "In the nature of the object."

*

 
from Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus
by Ludwig Wittgenstein
translated from German
by C. K. Ogden and F. P. Ramsey
 


2.0122      The thing is independent, in so far as it can occur in all possible circumstances, but this form of independence is a form of connexion with the atomic fact, a form of dependence. (It is impossible for words to occur in two different ways, alone and in the proposition.)

2.0123      If I know an object, then I also know all the possibilities of its occurrence in atomic facts.

                  (Every such possibility must lie in the nature of the object.)

                  A new possibility cannot subsequently be found.

2.01231    In order to know an object, I must know not its external but all its internal qualities.

2.0124      If all objects are given, then thereby are all possible atomic facts also given.

*

However, if you are patient (crazy) enough to read along in the Tractatus while listening to Carl sing, you will see he scored it out of order.

With a repetition here and there I'm not printing, and leaving out the numbers of the propositions, Carl scored and sings this lyric:

*

In order to know an object, I must know not its external but all its internal qualities.

The thing is independent, in so far as it can occur in all possible circumstances, but this form of independence is a form of connexion with the atomic fact, a form of dependence. (It is impossible for words to occur in two different ways, alone and in the proposition.)

If I know an object, then I also know all the possibilities of its occurrence in atomic facts.

If all objects are given, then thereby are all possible atomic facts also given.

(Every such possibility must lie in the nature of the object.)

A new possibility cannot subsequently be found.
 
*
This starts at Proposition 2.01231 (which is not where Carl left off on the previous song in the Tractatus score, "Atomic Facts"). Then he jumps back in the text to Proposition 2.0122, which is in fact where he had previously left off, and scores that. He keeps going into Proposition 2.0123, well and fine, but then leaps forward to Proposition 2.0124, leaving two lines from 2.0123 unsung, which he then goes back and scores to close the song. It's from this previously orphaned scrap of 2.0123 that Carl gets his outro and title, "In the nature of the object."
Technically, this breaks one of the few rules of a poetry score, which is to score every word of the poem in the order written by the poet. But the song is so brilliant, we forgive him.
 
*
Carl Pandolfi
 
Since this song shows more of Carl's classical training and skills, maybe now is the time to say he is classically trained, with composition degrees from Webster University and the Indiana University School of Music. His work has been performed by none other than the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra. He is also a veteran contributor to Poetry Scores and countless other creative projects and bands, notably The Lettuce Heads and The Painkillers. He is on SoundCloud too.

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"Started as an improvisation using piano and voice simultaneously," Carl said of this score. "Did some editing, adding all the words I had tried to get away with avoiding. Drones soaked in reverb makes music fun."

*

The Ogden/Ramsey translation of the Tractatus is in the public domain. The music is (c) 2014 by Carl Pandolfi. Free sharing of this mp3 is welcome and encouraged, but please consult Poetry Scores for production-quality audio and composer permission before making any commercial use. Thanks!

*



*
 
 

Sunday, March 2, 2014

"Shape of a man" translated into rock music and Russian

 
 



The poetry scorer scored: one of my own poems, "Shape of a man," has been scored for rock music by Nick Barbieri and translated into Russian by Kanat Omar.

Kanat has performed his translation in his hometown of Astana, Kazakhstan. With the help of our friend Joachim Faust, I performed my poem in Astana with Kanat that night without even leaving St. Louis.

Here is all that stuff in the order it happened, starting with my poem.


*


SHAPE OF A MAN

It is said (by my mother,
for one) that a woman will shape up a man
only for the man to move
on to another woman, more attractive
than she, superficially,
only available to the man because
he’s shaped up, now. It is sad,
she said, but it’s in our nature. There’s nothing
a woman can do. We can’t
stand a man to be so shapeless. But he can’t
stand still long enough for us
to shape up his sorry heart and soul the way
we clean up all his awful
things and body habits, just before he goes.

-- Chris King


*
 
 
Nick Barbieri's score of the poem.
 
 
(Nick Barbieri, Chris King)
Nick Barbieri
 
Nick Barbieri: drums, rhythm and lead electric guitar, vocals
Mark Buckheit: electric guitar
David Melson: bass
 
Produced and recorded by Nick Barbieri in St. Louis, Mo.
 
Mixed by Meghan Gohil at Hollywood Recording Studio in Los Angeles, CA
 
Mastered by Elijah "LIJ" Shaw at the Toy Box Studio in East Nashville, TN
 
This free download is intended for free sharing and non-commercial use with (c) reserved by Nick Barbieri/Chris King. Contact us regarding any commercial use. Thanks.
 
 
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Nick Barbieri, hotel selfie
 
 
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Kanat Omar's translation of the poem into Russian.
 

                                                                                                                                               Крис Кинг

ОБЛИК МУЖЧИНЫ



Было сказано (также и
моей матерью), что женщина лепит мужчину
только для того, чтобы он ушел
к другой женщине, более притягательной,
чем она сама, но разве что внешне,
доступной мужчине только потому, что
теперь он обрел черты. Это печально,
сказала она, но такова наша натура. Женщина
ничего не может с собой поделать. Мы не можем
оставить мужчину столь бесформенным. Но и он
не может оставаться с нами столько,
сколько надобно, чтобы вылепить его огорченное сердце и душу,
мы отскабливаем все его ужасные
свойства и телесные привычки просто перед тем, как он уходит.

- Перевод с английского Каната Омара
 
 
 
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Kanat Omar via Skype,
looking over the shoulder of Joachim Faust
 
  
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And then we have Kanat Omar performing his translation in Astana, prefaced by me performing the poem via Skype some 6,151 miles away in St. Louis. The beginning of my bit is slightly clipped.
 
 

 
 
I enjoy how the fancy coffee machines speak their international language in the background. Not sure why the camera operator focused on the bookshelf, not the poet.
 
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Kanat Omar is a Kazakh poet, journalist and filmmaker who visited the Center for the Humanities at Washington University last year for a five-week CEC Artslink Residency. Mary Laurita, a humanities dean at Washington University, introduced Kanat to Poetry Scores.
 
We have high hopes for working much more with Kanat, translating poetry in and out of our respective languages and other media. Stefene Russell of Poetry Scores is currently working on English translations of Kanat's poetry with Joachim Faust, and more St. Louis poetry is being translated into Russian by Kanat, his friend Pavel Bannikov, and others. Stay tuned!